The Dangling Conversation ~ Simon & Garfunkel

Some time ago my SoundCloud friend Mark introduced me to The Dangling Conversation.  I thought I knew pretty much all of Simon and Garfunkel’s well known songs… but I was so wrong, I’d never heard this one.

I absolutely loved it and found myself drawn to listen to this delightful song again and again.  One day while listening, I suddenly realised it might make an interesting poem for one of my spoken word creations.  And here it is… with a simple video included.  I also uploaded a version to my SoundCloud page.

I find it very interesting to speak poetry that isn’t mine.  It helps form a different pattern in my mind on how to speak and how to write poems.  We all have patterns that are part of how we think, which is perfectly natural, but it’s good to introduce something different now and then.  It helps reduce limitations and expands the writer on the inside.

After I recorded my version of The Dangling Conversation I did some more research on the song and found a 1968 black and white film of a High School teacher reading the lyrics in the process of teaching her class poetry.  I thought it was absolutely wonderful to see that.

I read in the video comments below from someone who was a pupil at that school during the time of the filming, they said the teacher was called Ms London.

I love the way she saw those lyrics as pure poetry and not just a song… such a cool teacher!

The Dangling Conversation is from Simon and Garfunkels Parsely, Sage, Rosemary And Thyme album.  If you’ve not heard it yet please take a listen, it’s a beautiful album.

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Mishmosh Poetry And Art

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I discovered this lovely lady speaking her poetry on SoundCloud some time ago.  I find her poetry inspiring and also very relaxing to listen to.  She has a huge selections of spoken word posts… these are some of her earlier posts.  Her collection of poetry will certainly keep the listener entertained for a long time.  Sit back and enjoy!

The beautiful colourful images she uses on her SoundCloud posts are all her own art.  You can find her Mishmosh Poetry and art on Facebook too.

Wedding Shoes

Kreg Steppe (CC)

It’s every little girls dream to know the feeling of importance, sophistication, and most of all, the high heeled elegance one pair of attractive shoes can deliver.

In my teens I had my share of stunning footwear, to know what it was like to effortlessly balance into infinite party hours on 41/2 inch shining pins and not flinch one bit as bones ached to be free.  I remember every beautiful pair.  But the one pair of shoes I loved most of all – were yours.

They hid in a gloomy corner at the bottom of your wardrobe, concealed by long dresses and heavy coats, never once seen on your feet.  I wondered why such pretty shoes should be condemned to shadows?

Pressing girlie feet into the toes of your divine shoes, I was Cinderella in glass slippers. Clumsy, teetering on falling, I clipped and flipped all the way from the bedroom to the kitchen, to demonstrate what you were missing.  Hands on hips, question marks in radiant eyes, I asked, “Mummy, are these your shoes?”  Your expression was a mixture of impending laughter and annoyance at the realisation of how clever your baby had become.   Hidden things would no longer be easy to keep to yourself.

You told me they were your wedding shoes.  I looked at your flat heeled sensible footwear and guessed those pretty shoes were a part of you I’d never know.  You would have liked to have told me to put them right back where I found them, but you were were too kind to say such things.

Jubilant at my discovery, I blundered my way round the house in wedding heels, wondering what kind of man I’d marry and if he… he’d like my shoes. 

I imagined living in London just like you, where traffic was never still, pavements filled with shoppers, and I… lady of the city, walked with confidence.

Just for one day, I borrowed the image of a beautiful woman I found in an old black and white photo, and walked in her shoes.

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My mother on holiday wearing those wedding shoes.

Did any of you girls clip around the house in your mothers shoes?

I don’t think I’ve ever heard of boys wearing their fathers shoes… so what is it boys do to feel like they could be their dad?


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The Snail’s CastleMark Gordon
Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk

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A Boat Beneath A Sunny Sky ~ Lewis Carroll (poetry collaboration with Mark Mayes)

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A boat, beneath a sunny sky
Lingering onward dreamily
In an evening of July

Children three that nestle near,
Eager eye and willing ear,
Pleased a simple tale to hear

Long has paled that sunny sky;
Echoes fade and memories die;
Autumn frosts have slain July.

Still she haunts me, phantomwise,
Alice moving under skies
Never seen by waking eyes.

Children yet, the tale to hear,
Eager eye and willing ear,
Lovingly shall nestle near.

In a Wonderland they lie,
Dreaming as the days go by,
Dreaming as the summers die;

Ever drifting down the stream
Lingering in the golden gleam
Life, what is it but a dream?
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Image: Pixabay

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A few weeks ago one of my lovely WP photography pals feralc4t suggested I should try reading a Lewis Carroll poem.  It’s not often I take a suggestion and create something this quickly, as a lot of what I post here is planned months in advance.  I found Lewis Carroll’s poetry fascinating, but was concerned I wouldn’t be able to read most of his poems without tripping up over words or just finding it all too funny – especially the Jabberwocky!

I had a good read of Lewis Carroll’s poetry and was surprised when I came across this elegant melancholy poem with a mention of Alice.  At the time of discovering this poem I’d not read Alice Through The Looking Glass, I didn’t know the poem was included in the book.  It’s an acrostic poem spelling out Alice Pleasance Liddell .  You can read more about it on worlddreambank.org

I initially intended reading it myself, but then thought of an idea to make a unique spoken word version.  I asked my talented SoundCloud friend Mark Mayes if he would be interested in a collaboration with me.  I was thrilled when he said yes. I thought his wonderful rich voice would be an ideal contrast to mine.  The arrangement in our version is a suggestion that Alice is lingering in the background as a ghostly memory.  It was a bit of challenge to produce, but I was pleased with the result.

Mark has studied at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art  and worked in both theatre and television.  I had a great interest in theatre myself in my late teens and participated in amateur drama for over four years.  I haven’t done anything remotely like this since that time.  It’s been wonderful to create this little spoken word drama with Mark.


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41wYUC6FHHLThe Right Wrong Man
Pamela S Wight

Blue ~ Poetry Video

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Captur-00Recently I was asked by a writer friend on WattPad (also Mia Lotus on You Tube) if I’d like to be one of the poets for a charitable project website of hers (Songs For The Sea) to encourage and inspire us all to care more about the ocean. I wrote two ocean related poems and also decided to create a poetry video.  My lovely artist friend Karen Gadient created some beautiful ‘blue’ abstract art to go with the poem

Most of my videos on my You Tube page that are not my own film are free creative commons footage, but on this occasion I decided to purchase some pieces of short film from Shutterstock.  They have an amazing collection of film footage on Shutterstock, but it’s probably not something I’ll be spending much money on with future videos as it’s quite costly.

The point of my poetry video is to show how misguided it is to spend so much time and money on space projects in the hope of finding life when there is an abundance of life in the ocean, some of which has barely been explored. 

The ocean is a world within our world and is so crucial to the functioning of the planet we live on.  Space on the other hand, fascinating it may be, but I don’t feel it’s as relevant as the sea or important enough to be spending vast sums of public money in exploration that doesn’t appear to result in much at all. The sea these days seems to be turning into a convenient dumping ground – that’s just so wrong.  I wonder if another habitable planet was ever found, humans would just go and dump their garbage there too?

You can find more poets writing on (Songs For The Sea) under the poetry category and also a collection of talented singers and musicians. In January 2017 there will be a CD music compilation of all the singers and musicians listed. 

Also at some point an ebook of poetry will be published.  Both of those items will be sold in aid of charity.  If it interests you, then make sure to bookmark the website for future visits.

Please enjoy the video – it’s a bit of chill out poetry experience! 🙂

Don’t Paint Me

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So
Mr Constable, da Vinci, Renoir
will you paint me in a tradition of oils
striking, bold, acrylic
or softly softly in colours of water?

Please don’t paint me with Mona Lisa smiles
serene and complacent

Don’t paint me frowning
in disapproval of the artist and his tricks

Don’t paint me with laughing eyes
when really they are sad

Don’t paint me in stained glass holiness
mother with child, Madonna blue
halos floating over

Don’t paint flirtations of your mind
paint me a real woman
the one who understands who she is
and knows what your brushes can do

So
Mr Picasso, Monet, Matisse
paint me as I am
or don’t paint me at all

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Picture: Elemantica

 

I wrote this poem nearly three years ago, it’s altered a little since first writing it.  Can’t believe it took me so long to get round to recording this.  Of course, it’s meant as light hearted and a bit of a joke – so don’t take it too seriously! 😀

I’ve never been painted – yet, and can’t quite imagine what it would be like to have a portrait painted.  Are any of you preserved on canvas?


51jIIyqg26LWindswept: Poems Of Love
Owain Glyn

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Dulce Et Decorum Est ~ Read by Christopher Eccleston

Dulce et Decorum est” is a poem written by Wilfred Owen during World War I, and published posthumously in 1920. The Latin title is taken from the Roman poet Horace and means “it is sweet and honorable…”, followed by pro patria mori, which means “to die for one’s country”. Owen’s poem is known for its horrific imagery and condemnation of war.
Wikipedia

I came across this poem a few days ago, and thought it was a powerful statement of the reality of war.  Dulce et Decorum est is just one of a collection of poetry readings remembering World War 1 (Channel 4 2013).  You can watch the other poems read various British actors on this You Tube channel.

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